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Apology For Blacklisted Workers

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Blacklisted GMB Workers Get High Court Apology From Construction Companies

Most of the biggest construction companies in the land apologised for the part they played in the secret blacklisting of 3,213 building workers and environmental activists and they will hang their heads in shame for the lives they destroyed with their arrogance and contempt says GMB.

Today, in the Royal Courts of Justice, the construction companies involved in the blacklisting case have apologised to the blacklisted workers for the untold damage and destroyed lives that they caused over decades for denying work to trade union members. (See notes to editors for defendants’ apology – point 29-31)

The 116 blacklisted GMB members received a full apology as well as receiving £5.4m in compensation when the agreement was reached on Friday 29th April 2016. GMB understand the total value of settlements for GMB, UCATT, GCR and Unite members is around £75m for 771 claimants including legal costs on both sides estimated at £25m.

Blacklisting came to light when in 2009 the ICO seized a Consulting Association database of 3,213 construction workers and environmental activists used by 44 companies to vet new recruits and keep out of employment trade union and health and safety activists.

The claims were brought against Carillion, Balfour Beatty, Costain, Kier, Laing O’Rourke, Sir Robert McAlpine, Skanska UK and VINCI and concerned thirty years of blacklisting activities by them, the Economic League and the Consulting Association.

Counsel for the Defendants said: “The Defendants are here today to offer, through me, their sincere and unreserved apologies to the Claimants for any damage caused. The Defendants apologise as providers of any information and for the loss of employment suffered as a result of communication of information during the operation of the Consulting Association. They also apologise for the anxiety and hurt to feelings caused as a result.”

Maria Ludkin, GMB Legal Director said: “All GMB could ever get for our members was compensation and a full apology. Today we feel truly vindicated to receive this apology for our blacklisted members. Despite years of denials, today the greedy goliaths have been forced to apologise and account for their unlawful blacklisting.”

Justin Bowden, GMB National Officer said: “In the Royal Courts of Justice today, and with their heads bowed before Lord Justice Supperstone, Carillion, Sir Robert McAlpine and most of the biggest construction companies in the land apologised for the part they played in the secret blacklisting of 3,213 building workers and environmental activists. They will hang their heads in shame for the lives they destroyed with their arrogance and contempt.

Government and employers’ organisations must never forget this sordid episode. Without strong regulation and penalties holding them to account, employers will always be tempted to put profit above people.”

End

Contact: Justin Bowden on 07710 631351 or Maria Ludkin 07956 632 657 or GMB press office on 07970 863411 or 07739 182691

Notes to editors

1 Counsel for the Claimant

1             In these claims, I act for the Claimants identified in the First Schedule attached to this statement. Those Claimants were at material times members of one or other of two trade unions: UCATT or GMB (or their predecessors) or were clients of the law firm Guney, Clark & Ryan.

2             Since at least the early 1970s and on the Claimants’ case the late 1960s a large number of Britain’s leading construction firms were involved in secretly collecting, storing and distributing amongst themselves information about workers who had, or who were applying for, work in the construction industry. The simple purpose of this operation was to create a database of information to vet particular workers in the construction industry. Long-held suspicions that this was taking place were finally confirmed in 2009 when, following the execution of a search warrant, the Information Commissioner (the “ICO”) seized various documents including a list of 3,300 names with additional identifying details and extant record cards for 1,800 individual workers on the list. The Claimants have always characterised this list of names and index cards as a blacklist. As the Defendants are here now publicly to accept, their secret vetting operation should never have happened. It caused harm to the employment opportunities of many workers. The secret nature of the operation meant that those on the database had no way of establishing whether they were included in it, or any chance to challenge the information that was kept and available for dissemination.

3             A large number of claims have been brought against the companies in this group litigation. Individual construction workers have brought claims for breach of confidence, misuse of private information, defamation, conspiracy and breach of the Data Protection Act 1998.

4             My learned friend, Andrew Caldecott QC appears for the construction companies who are respectively Defendants to these various claims, and to apologise on behalf of them publicly for any harm caused. In most cases the Claimants have accepted Part 36 offers. In three cases they have additionally accepted offers of amends made under the Defamation Act 1996. Insofar as other Macfarlanes Defendants are not joined in these actions, they associate themselves with the general apology made today on behalf of those who are.

The Vetting Operation

5             Between the early 1970s and 2009, a group of major construction industry companies were involved in setting up, funding, operating and/or subscribing to and using a secret scheme for vetting those working or seeking work in the construction industry.

6             Initially this was done by the Services Group and then, from 1993, by an organisation called the Consulting Association.

The Economic League and the Services Group

7             The Economic League (the “League”) was originally founded in 1919 and kept  national  and  regional  databases  of  alleged  left-wing  activists  and campaigners including trade unionists. The Services Group was a group of construction industry companies which was formed within the League following the national strike in the early 1970s.

8             The Services Group created and operated a database on certain individual construction workers (the “Services Group Database”). Included within the Services Group Database was information provided, from time to time, by individual members of the Services Group. Information from the Database was then disseminated to individual member companies in response to inquiries about individual workers.  Often, the provision of information led to a worker being refused employment.

9             Information held in the Services Group Database varied widely but commonly included such details as workers’ names, dates of birth, addresses and changes of address, national insurance numbers, trade, employers’ names, alleged employment history and, in a number of cases, suspected political affiliations or sympathies or perceived militancy, trade union affiliation or activities such as complaints about health and safety conditions or breaches of employment rights. Individuals’ entries sometimes contained express recommendations against employment. A few cards referred to private matters relating to health or personal relationships. Some record cards included press clippings about workers or newspaper articles by them, although there is an issue as to whether such material was passed on. What is described as the “Vetting Information” varied from Claimant to Claimant.

10           Ian Kerr joined the Economic League in 1969 and had a significant role in preparing and maintaining the Services Group Database. He collated and disseminated information that Services Group member companies had supplied. There are issues in the outstanding actions as to the precise legal status of the League and Mr Kerr’s legal relationship with the League and the construction companies at the material times.

11           Names of potential employees were sent by Services Group member companies to Mr Kerr for checking. This process often led to the failure of an application for employment or to the dismissal of an individual if they were already employed when the relevant name coincided with a record card.

12           Measures were taken to ensure that the existence and operation of the Services Group and its Database did not become publicly known. For example at each company subscribing to the Services Group a designated ‘main contact’ was generally the only person to whom information would be passed. It was a secret operation conducted without the knowledge or consent of the individuals who were the subject of these records. In consequence they could neither identify the information held about them nor challenge inaccuracies in any entries.

The formation of the Consulting Association

13           The Services Group’s existence was not publicly known until around 1989 when it was referred to in a series of newspaper articles and parliamentary debates and in a report of the House of Commons Employment Committee in February 1991. In consequence the Economic League as a whole, including the Services Group, was wound up in 1993. At least some of the records from the Services Group were used to form the basis of the card index system of the Consulting Association, which was set up by some of the former members of the Services Group.

14           The Consulting Association commenced operations in April 1993. It was an unincorporated association. McAlpines provided £10,000 towards the start- up costs of the new organisation. Mr Kerr acted as the Consulting Association’s salaried Chief Officer from 1993 until it was disbanded in February 2009.

15           The membership of the Consulting Association consisted of the construction companies that subscribed to its services. The membership altered from time to time over the course of the Consulting Association’s existence.  The members determined which other companies in the industry could join the Consulting Association.

16           The member companies periodically elected a chairman, who retained the office for a two or three year term. The chairmen over the course of the Consulting Association’s existence were, giving approximate years only in some cases, as follows:

1993-1996  Cullum McAlpine           (McAlpines)

1996-1999  Tony Jennings  (John Laing Construction Limited)

2000-2001  Danny O’Sullivan          (Kier Limited)

2002-2003  Stephen Quant  (Skanska UK)

2004-2005  Trevor Watcham           (Balfour Beatty plc)

2006-2009  David Cochrane            (McAlpines)

17           The subscribing companies paid an annual subscription for membership of the association on a quarterly basis and, in addition, a fee to check each name.

The Consulting Association Database

18           The Consulting Association Database included a colour coded list of 3,300 names in alphabetical order (the “Monodex List”), commonly with additional information to identify those individuals. Record cards for approximately 1,800 individuals were seized by the ICO in February 2009.

19           Information held in the Consulting Association Database varied widely but commonly included such details as workers’ names, dates of birth, addresses and changes of address, national insurance numbers, trade, employers’ names, alleged employment history and, in a number of cases, suspected political affiliations or sympathies or perceived militancy, trade union affiliation or activities such as complaints about health and safety conditions or breaches of employment rights. Individuals’ entries sometimes contained express recommendations against employment. A few cards referred to private matters including health or personal relationships. Some record cards included press clippings about workers or newspaper articles by them, although there is an issue as to whether such material was passed on. What is described as the “Vetting Information” varied from Claimant to Claimant.

20           Typically, at the end of each entry on a record card the source of the information would be stated, in the form of a numeric code. Each subscribing company was assigned its own code number. In some cases the initials of the individual from a subscribing company who had communicated the information to the Consulting Association was also included. On other occasions this individual would be identified by the phrase 'Main Contact'. This was a designated individual or a small number of designated individuals, usually senior employees in the human resources department, from whom information was received and to whom it was passed.

21           When lists of names were received from an inquiring member company they would be checked against the Monodex List. If a record card existed in relation to a name on a list from an inquiring company, the information contained on the card would then be passed to the inquiring company and the faxed lists were destroyed.

22           The record cards sometimes included recommendations about whether to employ the individual  in adverse terms. Record cards often recorded the failure of an application for employment. This is why the Claimants have referred to it as a “blacklist”.

23           The Consulting Association also operated in secret. The relevant workers had no way of knowing that they were included and no way of challenging what was recorded about them. The Claimants were very distressed to find they were included in these secret Databases on the basis of which some were refused employment.

The ICO raid in February 2009

24           The Consulting Association’s activities were brought to an end after the ICO executed a search warrant at the Consulting Association’s premises on 23 February 2009.

25           After the raid in February 2009 Mr Kerr was prosecuted by the ICO for failing to register as a data controller under the Data Protection Act 1998. He pleaded guilty and his fine and costs were paid by McAlpines. None of the companies who were members of the Consulting Association was prosecuted.

Admissions

26           Although they had originally denied liability in these proceedings, on 6 October 2015, the Macfarlanes Defendants made wide-ranging admissions about their involvement and roles in the Services Group and in the Consulting Association. The Defendants represented by Macfarlanes LLP are listed in the attached Second Schedule, but they include in alphabetical order: Balfour Beatty companies, Carillion, Costain, Kier Limited, Laing companies, Sir Robert McAlpine Limited, Skanska UK, Vinci, Taylor Woodrow, and various individual defendants, including Cullum McAlpine, Danny O’Sullivan, David Cochrane, and Stephen Quant.

27           The Macfarlanes Defendants admitted generally that the communication of information included in record cards in the Services Group Database bore the defamatory message that the worker concerned might pose a risk of unjustified disruption on any site on which he was employed at the time when the entry was made and for a reasonable time thereafter apart from any additional specific allegation(s) recorded. The company providing the information accepted responsibility as the publisher. It was also accepted that aspects of the information held in the Services Group Database were confidential  and  should  not  have  been  used  and  that  the  information sometimes included private and personal details. Like admissions were made in relation to the Consulting Association and, in addition, admissions were made regarding data protection. It was accepted that these activities had consequences for certain workers in terms of lost work opportunities or refusals of work and that they had an impact on some workers’ personal lives.

28           Together with their admissions, the Macfarlanes Defendants offered their unreserved apologies for their involvement in the secret systems, for the adverse employment consequences caused to workers and for the distress and anxiety caused to such workers and their families. The Claimants accept those apologies as sincere. The Macfarlanes Defendants also made monetary offers from December 2015 to March 2016, which the Claimants have accepted as reasonable and proportionate compensation for the harm suffered. The parties now hope that this matter can be treated as a closed chapter.

Counsel for the Defendants

29           My Lord, on behalf of the Defendants, I accept everything my learned friend has said. The Defendants are here today to offer, through me, their sincere and unreserved apologies to the Claimants for any damage caused. The Defendants apologise as providers of any information and for the loss of employment suffered as a result of communication of information during the operation of the Consulting Association. They also apologise for the anxiety and hurt to feelings caused as a result.

30           The Macfarlanes Defendants as a whole agree and endorse that apology. They openly accept and acknowledge that the essential failing of the Consulting Association system was its secrecy and the nature and content of the information it held. They apologise generally for the fact that information was communicated and kept in secret and was not subject to any or any effective verification process.

31           The Macfarlanes Defendants have agreed to pay to the Claimants appropriate sums by way of damages and their costs. In addition, suitable undertakings have been agreed between the parties.

Counsel for the Claimants

32           On behalf of the Claimants whom I represent today, they are pleased that their claims have been resolved.

2 GMB press release dated Monday, May 9, 2016

Blacklisted GMB Workers Win £5.4 Million Against Construction Companies

Preventing 3,213 workers earning a living to support their families was a gross injustice and government and employers’ organisations must never forget this sordid episode says GMB.

GMB settled its claim against the construction industry for a total of £5.4m plus millions in legal costs with some members receiving up to £200,000, the union can announce. An agreement was reached on Friday 29th April 2016 but the details of the compensation could not be revealed until all claimants’ cases had been resolved.

The 116 blacklisted GMB members also received a full apology from the companies involved and legal costs amounting to almost £3m were reclaimed from the companies in full.

Blacklisting came to light when in 2009 the ICO seized a Consulting Association database of 3,213 construction workers and environmental activists used by 44 companies to vet new recruits and keep out of employment trade union and health and safety activists.

GMB understand the total value of settlements for GMB, UCATT, GCR and Unite members is around £75m for 771 claimants including legal costs on both sides estimated at £25m. An unknown number of people, who in the face of continuing denial and obstruction from the companies, chose to take the much lower sums offered in their inferior compensation scheme.

Analysis of the figures show that the areas with the largest settlements for blacklisted workers were Humberside, £420,000 (10 workers), Greenock in Inverclyde with £405,000 (6 workers), London with £240,000 (9 workers) and Merseyside with £225,000 (2 workers). (See notes to editors for a full area breakdown).

The regional figures, shown in the table below, show Scotland has the highest settlement figure of £1,665,000 (32 workers) followed by the North West, £650,000 (13 workers) and Yorkshire & The Humber, £630,000 (17 workers).

Region

blacklisted workers

settlement

Scotland

31

£1,665,000

North West

13

£650,000

Yorkshire and the Humber

17

£630,000

South East

13

£590,000

Eastern

7

£360,000

London

9

£240,000

West Midlands

2

£225,000

South West

4

£215,000

Republic of Ireland

5

£200,000

North East

5

£150,000

Wales

2

£120,000

East Midlands

4

£115,000

Overseas

2

£115,000

Northern Ireland

2

£65,000

 

 

 

Total

116

£5,340,000

 

The claims were brought against Carillion, Balfour Beatty, Costain, Kier, Laing O’Rourke, Sir Robert McAlpine, Skanska UK and VINCI and concerned thirty years of blacklisting activities by them, the Economic League and the Consulting Association.

To the bitter end this litigation faced numerous obstacles, from both the defendants and incompetence from the Information Commissioners Office, who consistently failed to supply all the relevant information they held.

Tim Roache, GMB General Secretary said: “We have secured £5.4m of justice for the GMB members blacklisted by powerful construction companies who thought they were above the law. GMB is proud to have been the first union into the High Court and we are absolutely delighted that all of the blacklisting claimants have achieved generous settlements and a full apology from the blacklisting companies. For decades household name construction companies implemented an illegal blacklisting system, which denied a generation of trade union activists and health and safety reps an opportunity to provide for themselves and their families. Finally they have been held to account in public and at great cost to them financially and reputationally.

Preventing 3,213 workers earning a living to support their families was a gross injustice and government and employers’ organisations must never forget this sordid episode. Without strong regulation and penalties holding them to account, employers will always be tempted to put profit above people.”

Maria Ludkin, GMB Legal Director said: “We have always felt that our members deserved substantial compensation, and today we are satisfied that we have achieved the best settlements possible from the blacklisters.  All GMB could ever get for our members was compensation and a full apology. We could never get back years of their family lives stolen by the blacklisters who believed it was acceptable in Britain to put their profits ahead of health and safety and ordinary people lives and trade union voice in the workplace.

The companies involved tried to keep this dirty little secret hidden. GMB was determined to ensure that that was not going to happen and we have fought tooth and nail to ensure a just outcome.

To the bitter end, the companies have remained in denial that they were blacklisters, fearful that public acknowledgement could cost them public sector contracts worth billions of pounds.”

End

3  A week before the trial was due to start the ICO made further disclosures which should have been disclosed many months earlier.

4 Table showing numbers of workers and settlements received by area:

 

Blacklisted workers

Amount

Town

 

10

£420,000

Humberside

 

6

£405,000

Greenock

Inverclyde

9

£240,000

London

 

2

£225,000

Merseyside

 

1

£200,000

Sutton Coldfield

 

4

£175,000

Co Donegal

 

3

£155,000

Glasgow

 

1

£140,000

Renfrew

 

3

£120,000

Ardrossan

North Ayrshire

2

£115,000

Overseas

 

2

£100,000

Irvine

Ayrshire

1

£90,000

Chelmsford

Essex

1

£90,000

Laindon

Essex

1

£90,000

Cardiff

 

1

£90,000

Gourock

Inverclyde

1

£90,000

Grangemouth

Stirlingshire

1

£90,000

Port Glasgow

 

2

£85,000

Ellesmere Port

Cheshire

3

£80,000

Rotherham

 

1

£80,000

Rainham

Kent

1

£80,000

Strood

Medway

1

£80,000

Swindon

 

1

£80,000

Hamilton

 

2

£75,000

Teesside

 

3

£75,000

Tyne & Wear

 

1

£75,000

Lancaster

 

1

£70,000

Chorley

Lancashire

1

£70,000

Pudsey

West Yorkshire

1

£70,000

Redhilll

Surrey

1

£70,000

Livingston

 

1

£65,000

Loughborough

 

2

£65,000

Londonderry

 

1

£60,000

Dartford

Kent

1

£60,000

Milton Keynes

 

1

£60,000

Portland

Dorset

2

£60,000

Edinburgh

 

1

£55,000

Ringwood

Hampshire

1

£50,000

Billericay

Essex

2

£50,000

Southampton

 

2

£50,000

Paisley

 

1

£50,000

Stevenston

North Ayrshire

1

£45,000

Dagenham

Essex

1

£40,000

Barnstaple

Devon

1

£40,000

Duntocher

Clydebank

1

£35,000

Kirkby Stephen

Cumbria

1

£35,000

Runcorn

Cheshire

1

£35,000

Warrington

 

1

£35,000

Stowmarket

Suffolk

1

£35,000

Bromley

Kent

1

£35,000

Rochester

Kent

1

£35,000

Dunsford

Devon

1

£30,000

Blackpool

 

1

£30,000

Dover

 

1

£30,000

Llanelli

 

1

£25,000

Barrow-in-Furness

Cumbria

1

£25,000

Bury

 

1

£25,000

Keighley

 

1

£25,000

Wakefield

 

1

£25,000

Scunthorpe

North Lincs

1

£25,000

Walsall

 

1

£25,000

Canvey Island

Essex

1

£25,000

Romford

Essex

1

£25,000

Portsmouth

 

1

£25,000

Aberdeen

 

1

£25,000

Cowdenbeath

Fife

1

£25,000

Falkirk

 

1

£25,000

Parkhall

Clydebank

1

£25,000

West Kilbride

North Ayrshire

1

£25,000

County Galway

 

1

£15,000

Sleaford

Lincolnshire

1

£10,000

Manchester

 

1

£10,000

Sheffield

 

1

£10,000

Nottingham

 

1

£10,000

Oxford

 

 

3. The following extracts are from GMB witness statements in the High Court:

Witness A’s wife said: “Blacklisting stopped us having a family. We had our daughter in 1986, but this was much later than we wanted to. We had planned to have more children but without my husband being in work we couldn’t afford to.”

Witness B said: “When I was being refused work, or told there were no starts, I felt despair at not being protected because I was a safety rep. I thought the law would protect me in a situation like that. It was so frustrating sending out CVs and getting no responses. I felt like I was banging my head against a brick wall.”

Witness C said: “People thought I did not want to work, which was not the case and as a result I became more reclusive and felt left out. My brother thought I wasn’t working because I did not want to, rather than I could not get a job. He started looking at me a different way, as if he was thinking “haven’t you got a job yet?”……. I felt I was an embarrassment to my brother”

Witness D said: “I always enjoy my work, and take pride in doing a job well. Hearing about the blacklist caused a lot of bad memories to flood back about how my employment struggles affected my family and finances. We used to have to get milk tokens for my daughter’s milk, and we never had proper holidays.

I did not even have the money to buy my wife some flowers when she gave birth to our daughter.

My wife thought I was not trying hard enough to get work, and I did not know what I was doing wrong. She also had to work two jobs to make sure we kept our heads above water, and I found it very upsetting that I could not provide enough money for my family.

Once I picked up my daughter from school and the teacher took me to one side. She said that she had been in tears, and when they asked her what it was about, she had told them that she had heard her parents arguing and thought that no-one wanted to work with her dad.”

Witness D’s wife said: “I blamed my husband for not finding work when I knew that there was work available in construction in our area.

He used to leave home at 6am to search for work. He came back home around teatime.

When we were able to go on holiday, my husband did not come as we could not afford to pay for 3 people and he stayed at home to look for work.”

Witness E said: “I still feel traumatised by the deaths of my friends and colleagues on the site, and it appears now that I have been punished for standing up to show how their deaths were preventable. I believe that I was blacklisted in a vindictive and malicious way for standing up for the right thing.”

Witness E’s wife said: “I remember the stress of the weekly grocery shopping and having to choose what we could afford to buy. There were some weeks where we would go without things because others were needed more urgently. I recall having to put off buying soap and washing powder because essentials like food obviously came first.

I don’t believe that my husband has ever fully recovered from the events……. or from the distress he felt he felt about not being able to find work after it.”

4. Companies known to have used The Consulting Association blacklist:

Amec Building Ltd

Kier Ltd

Amec Construction Ltd

John Mowlem Ltd  -Ex Member

Amec Facilities Ltd

Laing O’Rourk (Laing Ltd)

Amec Ind Div

Lovell Construction (UK) Ltd – Ex Member

Amec Process & Energy Ltd

Miller Construction Limited – Ex Member

Amey Construction – Ex Member

Morgan Ashurst

B Sunley & Sons – Ex Member

Morgan Est

Balfour Beatty

Morrison Construction Group – Ex Member

Balfour Kilpatrick

N G Bailey

Ballast (Wiltshire) PLc – Ex Member

Shepherd Engineering Services

Bam Construction (HBC Construction)

Sias Building Services

Bam Nuttall (Edmund Nutall Ltd)

Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd

C B & I

Skanska (Kaverna/Trafalgar

Cleveland Bridge UK Ltd

House Plc)

Costain UK Ltd

SPIE (Matthew Hall) - Ex Member

Crown House Technologies

Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd – Ex Member

(Carillion/Tarmac Const)

Turriff Construction Ltd –Ex Member

Diamond M & E Services

Tysons Contractors – Ex Member

Dudley Bower & Co Ltd – Ex Member

Walter Llewellyn & Sons Ltd - Ex Member

Emcor (Drake & Scull) - ‘Ex Ref’

Whessoe Oil & Gas

Emcor Rail

Willmott Dixon – Ex Member

G Wimpey Ltd – Ex Member

Vinci PLC (Norwest Holst Group).

Haden Young

 

 

 

Names in brackets indicate where companies have undergone a change of name or where subsidiaries have been absorbed by parent companies.

5. Managers named as blacklisters (Most initials are from the files of those blacklisted.)

Michael Aird (MA) - Balfour Kilpatrick - Glasgow

Kathy Almansoor (KA) - Kier Group – Sandy, Bedfordshire

Dave Aspinall (DA) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Alan Audley (AA) – Vinci - Watford

John Ball (JB) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Ron Barron (RB) - CB & I – Tonbridge, Kent

Valerie Bennison (VB) – Whessoe - Darlington

Ernie Boswell (EB) - Kier Group – Sandy, Bedfordshire

Richard Bull (RB) - HBG Construction (BAM) – Colindale, London

Iain Coates (IC) – Emcor – Kew Bridge, Twickenham

David Cochrane (DC) - Sir Robert McAlpine – Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

Ann Cowrie (AC) - Balfour Beatty Civil Engineering - Edinburgh

Tony Crowther – AMEC – Knutsford, Cheshire

John Dangerfield (JD) - Balfour Beatty Scottish & Southern - Basingstoke, Hampshire

Lynn Day (LD) - Cleveland Bridge UK – Darlington

John Dickinson (JD) – Skanska – Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire

Frank Duggan (FD) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

John Edwards (JE) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Kevin Gorman (KG) - Carillion / Crown House - Solihull

Elaine Gallagher (EG) - Balfour Kilpatrick - Glasgow

Gerry Harvey (GH) - Balfour Kilpatrick - Glasgow

Roy Hay (RH) – Tarmac - Solihull

David Hillman - Sir Robert McAlpine – Birmingham

Keith Horner (KH) - Ballast Wiltshire

Dianne Hughes (DH) – Tarmac / Crown House  - Solihull

Geoff Hughes (GH) – Costain – Maidenhead, Berkshire

Greg Ingleton (GI) – Emcor – Kew Bridge, Twickenham

Prue Jackson (PJ) - Haden Young - Watford

Vince James (VJ) - Balfour Beatty Scottish & Southern – Basingstoke, Hampshire

Armar Johnston (AJ) - Balfour Kilpatrick – Livingstone

Liz Keates (LK) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Sheila Knight (SK) – Emcor – Kew Bridge, Twickenham

Ian Leake (IL) - Taylor Woodrow, Watford

Tim Llewellyn (TL) - Walter Llewellyn & Sons Ltd, Eastbourne, East Sussex

Alf Lucas (AL) – Mowlem

Bridget May (BM) – Nuttall – Camberley, Surrey

Cullum McAlpine - Sir Robert McAlpine – Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

Paul McCreath (PM) - HBG Construction (BAM) – Colindale, London

Steve McGuire (SM) - Morgan Est plc – Warrington

John Morrison (JM) - Morrison Construction - Edinburgh

Arnold Nestler (AN) - AMEC – Knutsford, Cheshire

Lisa O’Mahoney (LOM) - Laing O’Rourke – Dartford, Kent

Danny O’Sullivan (DOS) - Kier Group – Sandy, Bedfordshire

Sandy Palmer (SP) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Harry Pooley (HP) - Rosser & Russell - Watford

Derek Price – Morgan Ashurst – Stratford upon Avon

Stephen Quant (SQ) – Skanska – Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire

Paul Raby (PR) - Balfour Kilpatrick - Glasgow

Murray Reid (MR) - NG Bailey – Ilkley, West Yorkshire

Roger Robinson (RR) - Carillion / Crown House - Wolverhampton

Sylvia Smith (SS) - Laing O’Rourke – Dartford, Kent

Trevor Spice (TS) – Costain – Maidenhead, Berkshire

Lisa Stevenson (LS) - Shepherd Engineering Services - York

John Stoddart (JS) - SIAS Building Services - Keighley

Alan Swift – Crown House Technologies - Manchester

Pat Swift (PS) - BAM Nuttall - Guildford

Alan Thorniley (AT) – Vinci - Watford

Brian Tock (BT) - Carillion / Crown House - Solihull

Ken Ward (KW) – Costain – Maidenhead, Berkshire

Trevor Watchman (TW) - Balfour Beatty Major Projects – Redhill, Surrey

Steve Wigmore – Crown House Technologies - Solihull

Allison Wilkins – Skanska – Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire

Carolyn Williams (CW) - Haden Young – Watford

6. Where blacklisted workers came from.

Blacklisted workers – number in each area

 

 

 

 

Location

Number on the blacklist

 

Location

Number on the blacklist

 

 

Aberdeen City

14

 

Kent

95

Aberdeenshire

54

 

Kingston upon Hull

62

Anglesey

3

 

Lancashire

60

Angus

5

 

Leeds

53

Argyll & Bute

7

 

Leicestershire

5

Bath and North East Somerset

1

 

Lincolnshire

13

Bedfordshire

4

 

Manchester

183

Berkshire

2

 

Merseyside

173

Birmingham

69

 

Midlothian

3

Bristol

25

 

Monmouthshire

9

Buckinghamshire

20

 

Norfolk

7

Cambridgeshire

12

 

North Ayrshire

67

Cardiff

10

 

North Lanarkshire

22

Ceredigion

9

 

North Yorkshire

12

Cheshire

64

 

Northamptonshire

14

City of London

454

 

Northern Ireland

1

Clackmannanshire

3

 

Northumberland

7

Cornwall & Isles of Scilly

3

 

Nottinghamshire

12

Cumbria

27

 

Orkney Islands

1

Denbighshire

34

 

Oxfordshire

8

Derbyshire

16

 

Perth & Kinross

2

Devon

19

 

Powys

2

Dorset

8

 

Redcar and Cleveland

43

Dumfries & Galloway

6

 

Renfrewshire

15

Dundee City

21

 

Rhondda Cynon Taf

2

Durham

11

 

Rhondda, Cynon, Taff

3

East Ayrshire

18

 

Rotherham

56

East Lothian

1

 

Shropshire

2

East Riding of Yorkshire

16

 

Somerset

5

East Sussex

8

 

South Lanarkshire

16

Edinburgh, City of

52

 

Southern Ireland

1

Essex

57

 

Staffordshire

16

Falkirk

35

 

Stirling

7

Fife

24

 

Suffolk

9

Glasgow City

140

 

Surrey

32

Gloucestershire

32

 

Swansea

15

Gwynedd

12

 

Tyne & Wear

69

Hampshire

50

 

Warwickshire

1

Hereford & Worcester

3

 

West Dunbartonshire

8

Hertfordshire

14

 

West Lothian

12

Highland

15

 

West Sussex

11

Inverclyde

26

 

Wiltshire

5

Isle of Wight

1

 

Wokingham

10

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